Regulation & Law

Interview with Bruno Feigelson – Chief Executive Officer of Sem Processo

Bruno Feigelson is CEO of Sem Processo, a Brazilian lawtech which reduces litigation by connecting lawyers from both sides of the table. In this interview, Mr. Feigelson discusses technology’s potential to decrease legal disputes in Brazil and abroad.
Bruno Feigelson is CEO of Sem Processo, a Brazilian lawtech reducing litigation by connecting lawyers from both sides of the table.

© Leaders League

Bruno Feigelson is CEO of Sem Processo, a Brazilian lawtech which reduces litigation by connecting lawyers from both sides of the table. In this interview, Mr. Feigelson discusses technology’s potential to decrease legal disputes in Brazil and abroad.


Leaders League. How can technology help reduce litigation in Brazil?


Bruno Feigelson. In Brazil, we currently have a unique situation in which 1.3% of GDP is spent on the judiciary and over 100 million cases are ongoing in tribunals nationwide. Furthermore, we have reached the landmark of over one million lawyers and more than 1,240 law schools - an absolute global record.

 

New disruptive processes are stimulating reflections on the State, regulation and law, due to the speed with which they take hold and the intensity with which they enter our day-to-day social relations. Today, the main digital tool for reducing litigation in Brazil is online dispute resolution (ODR). Thanks to technological breakthroughs, these methods offer swifter, cheaper and more efficient solutions which allows for the prevention of new disputes as well as the resolution of existing cases. ODR platforms are already widely used in Brazil, not only for repetitive cases popularly known as “mass litigation,” but also for strategic issues such as improving the decision-making of magistrates and lawyers. In the next few years, once the cultural shift to a scenario of law 4.0. occurs - in line with the ongoing Fourth Industrial Revolution - the field of civil litigation will be deeply affected as well as other areas such as labor law.

 

 

Could you give us practical examples of how this is already happening?

 

We currently have a series of lawtechs exclusively focused on the online dispute resolution market. These startups, which are exclusive to the legal sector, seek to play a preventive role and resolve already judicialized conflicts by promoting conciliation. In this way, ODR startups contribute to internal and external cost reduction, in addition to speeding up and rationalizing the negotiation process by using the data generated from each negotiation via a data-driven legal approach. Nowadays, these platforms handle thousands of monthly cases, a development which represents a still unmeasured quantitative impact on the Brazilian legal market and our judiciary.

 

 

What is Sem Processo and how does it work?

 

Sem Processo is an online platform which connects businesses and lawyers from opposite sides of the table. Conflict resolution is directly handled by the respective parties online, in a much swifter and safer manner. The platform currently consists of two modules: (i) Pre-litigation: Here a lawyer uploads the petition to the platform before proposing an action; and (ii) Litigation:  In which companies seek attorneys through the platform for already judicialized cases. Potential negotiations also occur via the platform, directly between in-house legal departments and the consumer’s attorney, without any sort of mediation from Sem Processo.

 

How is the Brazilian judiciary responding to technological innovation?

 

Every year, the Brazilian judiciary exceeds our expectations for legal and technological innovation and is thus a focal point for many of the disruptions occurring in the legal market. All the relevant spheres of the judiciary, such as the Regional Federal Court (TRF), the Superior Court of Justice (STJ) and the Supreme Court (STF), have adopted tools for innovation and integrated A.I. technology to assist with caseload management. Although these technologies are still under trial, if we take the current scenario of the Brazilian judicial system into account, I believe Brazil has all the necessary conditions to become an internationally famous case-study for the application of new technologies in law.

 

 

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Accenture's CEO and CFO interview by Leaders League Group

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